Reignite the fire

Teaching is a hard job. It’s quite easy to become disheartened sometimes. I think the best advice someone gave me once was “Look after yourself. Make sure you get enough rest.┬áBe nice to your mind and your body. Be nicer to yourself than you think you should be”.

If you are looking for some thought-provoking quotes to keep things in perspective, remind you of the end-game and reignite the fire in your own teaching you should checkout this compilation Tony Vincent put together below:

Education & Technology Quotes

View more presentations from Tony Vincent.
My personal favourite is
The need to know the capital of Florida died when my phone learned the answer. Rather, the students of tomorrow need to be able to think creatively: they will need to learn on their own, adapt to new challenges and innovate on-the-fly.
The job market of the future, if not already, will prioritise skills over knowledge. I personally believe the UK National Curriculum in mathematics does not promote the development of skills over knowledge. We still sit students in exams which test their recall of knowledge, not their ability to identify and teach themselves the knowledge they require to solve a problem. The new Functional Skills exams certainly assess how pupils are able to innovate and apply past knowledge but fall short in the area of getting pupils to identify and teach themselves what they need to know, in my opinion.
When I previously worked as an engineer one of the first things I was taught was if someone came to you and said “I need you to design me a bridge over a river”, your first response should be “why a bridge rather than a tunnel or a ferry?”.
What does this all means for pedagogy in my own classroom? I’m not sure yet to be honest but it is something in the back of my mind all the time.
What do you think?
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2 thoughts on “Reignite the fire

  1. Pingback: Reignite the fire | Great Maths Teaching Ideas | #scimath | Scoop.it

  2. Thanks for sharing Tony’s slideshow and your thoughts on the importance of asking “why” to think critically, examine assumptions and become, in Dan Meyer’s words, patient problem solvers.

    What other information are you looking for before you make a decision with regard to your classroom?

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